Earth Process Modelling

The Earth Process Modelling group focuses on the modelling of the various earth processes as explained below:

Understanding the earthquake occurrence processes and associated tectonic and anthropogenic deformation helps in taking up mitigating measures and thus has direct societal benefits. We use various analytical and numerical models using elastic, poroelastic and visco-elastic theory to understand the causative mechanism of both triggered and tectonic earthquakes, and the role of various hydrological phenomena, e.g., precipitation, water extraction and injection in earthquake occurrence.
The rate of surface processes governs the rates and patterns of deformation in the lithosphere, as well as the occurrence of earthquakes. We employ a combination of advection, diffusion, and reaction physics to conduct both forward and inverse modelling of surface processes across different physiographic regions of the Indian subcontinent. These analyses offer us insights into the geological history of the tectono-climatic conditions in these regions and highlight the inherent non-stationarity of tectonic processes.
Modelling hydrological processes is crucial for developing sustainable water management strategies in the changing climate. We integrate in situ and remote sensing-based observations to model hydrologic processes, drought propagation, and the impact of climate change and variability on water resources at a regional to global scale.
Geodynamic processes involve changes in the Earth's lithosphere due to internal heat, mantle convection, and plate-driving forces. The interaction of lithospheric plates at different boundaries creates new crust, forms mountains, cause earthquakes and triggers volcanic activity. This interplay shapes Earth's surface features and geological hazards. We are constructing computer models using geophysical, geological, and geochemical information to understand these processes.
The prime objective of submarine earthquake triggered tsunami modelling is to forecast the time of tsunami arrival, its wave heights, and inundation extent in the vulnerable coastal plains. These predictions are helpful for an early warning of tsunami, emergency response planning, and evacuation strategies. Our focus is to understand the impacts of tsunami, originating from the Makran Subduction Zone (MSZ) and the Andaman Sumatra Subduction Zone (ASZZ), on the Indian coastal region through detailed numerical simulations.

 

Head of the group


Dr. Kalpna Gahalaut

Dr. Kalpna Gahalaut

Chief Scientist

Group Members


Dr. Akarsh A

Dr. Akarsh A

Scientist

Dr. Ramendra Sahoo

Dr. Ramendra Sahoo

Scientist

G. Harini

Mrs.G. Harini

Senior Technical Officer(1)

Farveen Begum

Ms.Farveen Begum

Senior Technical Officer(1)